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Stanford Study: A Clear Link Between Breast Cancer Chemo, Chemo Brain and Brain Abnormalities

Stanford Study: A Clear Link Between Breast Cancer Chemo, Chemo Brain and Brain Abnormalities

A breast cancer diagnosis can be one of the most stressful experiences of a person’s life. The decisions related to course of treatment are important and intensely personal. Doctors, family members and others may chime in, but only YOU know what is right for you. If you are thinking about chemotherapy, it is up to you to also know about the risks on all levels, including to mental health.

Chemo Brain and Chemotherapy Side Effects: What’s Really Going On?

You have probably heard of the term “chemo brain.” It is a light-hearted term for a potentially serious problem. Also known as “chemo fog,” chemo brain usually occurs during or shortly after chemotherapy treatments of any kind and can have the following effects:

  • confusion
  • mental fatigue
  • difficulty learning new skills
  • disorganization
  • short-term memory impairment
  • shortened attention span
  • difficulty with verbal communication/forming words
  • taking a long time to complete tasks

The Mayo Clinic states that “[i]t’s unlikely that chemotherapy is the sole cause of concentration and memory problems in cancer survivors.” Recent research, however, has begun to pinpoint the exact mechanisms linking non-brain tumor neurological abnormalities to chemotherapy treatments, including those used for breast cancer.

Stanford Study: Changes in Thinking Seen in Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Patients

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